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ERIC Number: ED475153
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2002-Nov-19
Pages: 35
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Reconceptualizing Education as an Engine of Economic Development: A Case Study of the Central Educational Center.
MacAllum, Keith; Johnson, Amy Bell
The Central Educational Center (CEC) in Newnan, Georgia, is a unique partnership of local businesses and industries, the Coweta County Schools, and West Central Technical College. The CEC's programs were designed to address key concerns of Coweta County educators, parents, business owners and managers, college administrators, and students. The CEC's program is based on the following key principles that were identified through a review of the best available research and practice: (1) partnership and community involvement; (2) an employer-driven curriculum based on local needs assessment; (3) smooth transitions between high school and higher education and the workplace; (4) experiential learning with adults in the real work world; (5) dual enrollment leading to a diploma and certification; (6) high expectations for all students; (7) flexibility creating an opportunity for innovation; and (8) data-driven accountability. CEC's founders decided to establish it as a charter school because of the considerable freedom that charter school status affords with respect to organizational structure, management, and instructional practice. CEC serves students in both high school and technical college and offers a variety of work-based learning experiences through internships, simulations in labs, and paid work experiences. Since opening in 2000-2001, CEC has served as an engine of economic development in Coweta County and its enrollment has increased from 400 to 856 students per semester. (Contains 10 references.) (MN)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC. National Inst. for Work and Learning.