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ERIC Number: ED473285
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2002-May
Pages: 310
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Factors that Influence Community College Faculty Participation in Distance Education.
O'Quinn, Lisa Rosanne
The purpose of this study was to determine what factors motivated community college faculty to participate in distance education. It examined the following factors from the perspective of faculty and division chairs: (1) preference toward synchronous and asynchronous course delivery; (2) rewards for distance education faculty; (3) rewards for faculty who participate in distance education training; (4) faculty rewards for developing distance education courses; (5) areas best complemented by distance education: teaching, research, or services; (6) factors that motivate faculty to participate in distance education; (7) factors that inhibit faculty from participating in distance education; and (8) attitudes toward distance education. The National Center for Educational Statistics reports that as of 1998, 34% of colleges and universities across the United States offered distance education programs. The continued growth of distance education programs is evidence that learning is no longer a linear exercise, the demand for lifelong learning will continue, and the growth of the Internet has expanded access to education. Based upon 180 responses (out of a sample of 587) from division chairs, distance faculty, and classroom faculty, the author found that faculty expressed concerns about the lack of rewards for teaching distance education, plagiarism and cheating, and how well distance education would benefit students. The author recommends establishing standards for distance education. Contains 20 tables, 109 references, and research instruments. (Author/NB)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Doctoral dissertation presented to George Washington University for Ph.D.