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ERIC Number: ED472031
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2002-Sep
Pages: 18
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Breaking the Silence: The Black Church Addresses HIV.
Swartz, Aimee
HIV Impact, Sep-Oct 2002
AIDS is the leading cause of death among African Americans age 25-44 years. About half of all new U.S. HIV cases are African Americans, though African Americans make up only 13 percent of the population. Most U.S. children living with HIV are African American. There exists a strong pattern of resistance and denial of the disease in the African American community. Since the black church remains the cornerstone of this community, it is uniquely positioned to significantly affect knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors within the congregation. Through personal linkages to community members, ministers can often get messages across without encountering resistance. Some religious leaders nationwide are talking the lead in addressing HIV and AIDS within the African American community. This newsletter also includes articles on: "OMHRC Presents Internet Poster at Internet AIDS Conference"; "Maintaining a Direct Line to the Latino Community: Spanish Language Education Programs"; "Getting Youth Involved: NAFEO Pioneers HIV/AIDS Education Program at HBCUs"; "Addressing the Risk: HIV in Young African American Men"; "Helping Close the Treatment Gaps: AIDS Drug Assistance Programs"; "Border Health Initiatives: Preventing Cross-Border HIV Infection in Men"; "Hepatitis C Coinfection: A Dangerous Trend"; and "CDC Calls for New Health Promotion Strategies Study: Intentional Unprotected Sex Increasing among MSMs" (all articles by Aimee Swartz); and "Caribbean Women Organize against HIV: Group Provides Services for Region's Immigrants" (Ellen Schnepel and John Glover). (SM)
For full text: http://www.omhrc.gov/omh/sidebar/archivedhiv.htm.
Publication Type: Collected Works - Serials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Office of Minority Health (PHS/DHHS), Washington, DC.
Note: Published quarterly.