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ERIC Number: ED471831
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2002-May
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Creating a Place for Learning: Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement.
Parrish, Marilyn McKinley
Griff Foley's (1999) framework for analysis of learning in social movements is a way to examine how participants replace dominant discourses with emancipatory discourses. Dorothy Day's use of advocacy journalism, development of alternative, radical communities of faith, and ongoing challenge to the dominant culture through public protest and persistent critique of church and culture demonstrate how learning through conflict was present in the "Catholic Worker," a newspaper and movement she helped start in 1933. Examination shows, for many Catholic students and intellectuals, the Catholic Worker was an ideal place to learn because of its emphasis on integration of ideas with experience and opportunity to learn from people coming from a variety of perspectives. Many Catholic Workers today who live and work in Catholic Worker communities nation- and world-wide share this perspective. Day's persistent challenge to the status quo links her to many women who have worked for reform in American society. Viewing these efforts toward learning through components of Foley's framework allows for greater understanding of how Day and others in the CW movement unlearned dominant discourses and learned oppositional and emancipatory discourses. Paying attention to the social context of learning in a radical community of faith offers the opportunity to understand both a woman and a social movement overlooked in standard adult education histories and explore other-than-dominant culture representations of learning in the history of adult education. (22 references) (YLB)
Adult and Community College Education, Box 7801, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7801 ($30). For full text: http://www.ncsu.edu/ced/acce/aerc/start.pdf.
Publication Type: Historical Materials; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A