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ERIC Number: ED471458
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2002
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Counseling Adult Learners for New Careers: The Motivations and Barriers Associated with Postsecondary Educational Participation of Soldiers in Transition.
Covert, Clinton M.
A qualitative case study approach with individual and focus group interviews identified senior enlisted Army soldiers' primary motivations and perceived barriers to postsecondary education participation. The 92 interviewees shared these common characteristics: they were enlisted soldiers, were older, attended college part time, worked full time, possessed a high school diploma or equivalent, had completed an associate degree, and were near retirement and a career transition. Nonparticipants (defined as soldiers who had not taken a college course in the last five years and who were not pursuing a Bachelors degree) named these two primary factors as having the most impact on motivation to participate in college: interest in subject and desire to learn a specific skill. Participants named these two factors: desire to obtain a credential and desire for enhanced self efficacy. Nonparticipants named these two factors as perceived barriers to participation: lack of interest and lack of course offerings. Participants named these two barriers: type of unit assignment and unsupportive supervisor. Conclusions were that active participants were motivated by a sense of investing in their human capital; the Army installation's educational directives, policies, and practices toward postsecondary education opportunities varied across commands and individual units due to different organizational cultures and individual leaders' values; information dissemination about learning activities was lacking and counseling services were disjointed or nonexistent; and participants' primary motivation was the need to obtain a credential. (21 references) (YLB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners; Counselors
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A