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ERIC Number: ED471271
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2000-Mar-23
Pages: 58
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Statistical Portrait of Working at Home in the U.K.: Evidence from the Labour Force Survey. Working Paper.
Felstead, Alan; Jewson, Nick; Phizacklea, Annie; Walters, Sally
The patterns, extent, and problems of working at home in the United Kingdom were examined through a multivariate analysis of data from the Labour Force Survey, which has questioned respondents about the location of their workplace since 1992. The numbers of people working "mainly" at home increased from 345,920 (1.5%) in 1981 to 680,612 (2.5%) in 1998. Those working from home at least 1 day per week accounted for 3.5% of the employed workforce, with those working from home "sometimes" accounting for a further 22%. Higher occupational groups were overrepresented among those working mainly or sometimes at home. Three of five of those who work at home at least 1 day per week relied on computers and telecommunications to keep in touch with clients and colleagues. Approximately three-fourths of manual workers who work at home received low pay versus one-fifth of their conventionally located counterparts. Women accounted for 69% of those working mainly at home. Except in certain categories (which did not include manual work), ethnic minorities were underrepresented among those working at home. Women who worked mainly at home were more likely to report having dependent children. (The bibliography lists 51 references. Eight tables are included. Information on data availability and descriptions of variables are appended.) (MN)
Programme Administrator (Glenda Smith), Western Campus, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT. Tel: 0113 343 4504; e-mail: g.smith@leeds.ac.uk. For full text: http://www.clms.le.ac.uk/WWW/home_working/PDF/Working_Paper_4.pdf.
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Economic and Social Research Council, Lancaster (England).
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: United Kingdom