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ERIC Number: ED470785
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2002
Pages: 3
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Perceived Influence of Industry-Sponsored Credentials in the Information Technology Industry. In Essence: Key Findings from the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education No. 2.
Naylor, Michele
The perceptions of human resource (HR) managers and information technology (IT) professionals regarding the influence of industry-sponsored credentials (ISCs) on recruitment, training, career development, and selected organizational outcomes were examined. Data were collected from 33 (66%) of 50 HR executives surveyed and from a Web-based survey completed by 245 IT employees from 13 organizations employing a total of 13,236 workers. HR executives still considered a traditional 4-year college degree in an IT-related field over an ISC to be the desired credential held by job applicants. Although they credited ISCs with making the recruitment process easier and time efficient, most HR executives believed that ISCs reduce employees' sense of teamwork, camaraderie, and ability to solve problems creatively. More than two-thirds of the IT employees had one or more ISCs, and most believed that ISCs have positive impacts on recruitment, reduce organizations' training costs, reduce the time required for new employees to learn their jobs, and increase new employees' chances for success. However, ISCs appeared to have a negative (albeit not statistically significant) impact on employees' level of organizational commitment. The study findings are potentially of concern for employees and career and technical education teachers--especially those planning to use ISCs as an entry point into the IT industry. (MN)
For full text: http://www.nccte.org/publications/infosynthesis/in-essence/in-ess ence2/index.asp.
Publication Type: Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: National Dissemination Center for Career and Technical Education, Columbus, OH.