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ERIC Number: ED470577
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2002-Apr
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Study of Faculty Workload as a Means of Improving the Student Learning Environment.
Hinrichsen, Bonnie B.; Jackson, Janet E.; Johnson, Celia E.; Templeton, Rosalyn Anstine; Flannigan, Peggy N.; Lawrence, Betty Jane; Modianos, Doan T.; Skaggs, Jobie L.
As part of a campus self-study, more than 100 faculty members as a mid-sized private university met to explore the scholarship of teaching, and in a subsequent conversation, to focus on things that hinder the scholarship of teaching. To assess faculty workloads and determine their effect on the learning environment, a survey was developed and distributed to 301 faculty members in 5 colleges. Usable surveys were returned by 67 faculty members, some from each college. Years of service, tenure status, rank, average class size, reported teaching load, office hours, course preparation time, and research time were all analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. The majority of faculty members reported a 9-hour undergraduate workload, with total hours per week in teaching-related activities averaging 37.5. When research and creative activity were added to total work time, a total of 54.5 hours per week was reported. These data demonstrate that this university faculty spends 68% of total workload on teaching and related activities. A comparison with national figures for similar and different institutions suggests the total work time per week for this university is higher than for other private universities, and that faculty spend more time teaching than is average. Additional study is necessary to determine exactly how teaching load affects the learning environment on campus. (Contains 8 figures and 13 references.) (Author/SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A