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ERIC Number: ED470432
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2000
Pages: 4
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Violence Prevention and Conflict Resolution Curricula. What Works in Preventing School Violence.
Skiba, Russell
In the face of pervasive violence in American schools and society, many schools have begun to consider making violence prevention and conflict resolution part of their curricula. Faced with such a culture of violence, curricula that teach students the attitudes and skills they need to avoid violence seem to provide a sound strategy for violence prevention. Although differing in their emphases, violence prevention, conflict resolution, and social problem-solving curricula all attempt to increase student knowledge, to improve their awareness of feelings, and to teach new skills that can provide an alternative to violence. Due to the newness of the field, it is impossible to know how much impact such instruction can have, but evaluations of some programs have suggested that systematic and consistent violence-prevention instruction is a promising approach that can contribute to school safety. Since the field is young, schools seeking to implement the program should carefully evaluate the curriculum and plan implementation. The most important challenge in adopting such a curriculum may be to find an approach that is consistent with the school's needs and can be fully accepted by faculty to ensure a high level of commitment and consistency in implementation. (RT)
Indiana Education Policy Center, Smith Research Center, 100, 2805 East Tenth Street, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408-2698. Tel: 812-855-1240; Fax: 812-855-0420; e-mail: adsimmon@indiana.edu. For full text: http://www.indiana.edu/~iepc/welcome.html.
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Special Education Programs (ED/OSERS), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Indiana Univ., Bloomington. Education Policy Center.; Nebraska Univ., Lincoln.
Note: Part of the Safe and Responsive Schools Project Fact Sheet Series.