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ERIC Number: ED470233
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2002-Sep
Pages: 34
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
What Do Teachers Teach? A Survey of America's Fourth and Eighth Grade Teachers. Civic Report.
Barnes, Christopher
This report contains results from a survey of U.S. fourth and eighth grade teachers that examined their teaching philosophies, classroom teaching methods and practices, academic expectations for students, and opinions on other education policy issues. Overall, a majority of teachers described their teaching philosophies as leaning more toward student-directed learning. Most favored the premise that learning how to learn is extremely important for students. More than half of fourth grade teachers did not expect students to spell correctly at all times. Only about one quarter of all teachers placed the greatest emphasis on whether the student provided the correct answers. While only about one-fifth of fourth grade math teachers allowed students to use calculators in class to solve problems, about three-quarters of eighth grade teachers permitted such calculator use. About one-third of teachers rated student feedback as the most important factor in personal evaluation of their own work. Over half of fourth grade teachers preferred small-group cooperative learning to whole-class instruction. Most teachers considered parents an asset to education processes. A substantial majority favored ending social promotion of students and believed that their schools' policies gave them enough authority to effectively maintain order in the classroom. (SM)
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, 52 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York, NY 10017. Web site: http://www.manhattan-institute.org.
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc., Greensboro, NC.
Authoring Institution: Manhattan Inst., New York, NY. Center for Civic Innovation.; Connecticut Univ., Storrs. Center for Survey Research and Analysis.