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ERIC Number: ED469748
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2002-Jul
Pages: 35
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
On Science Achievement from the Perspective of Different Types of Tests: A Multidimensional Approach to Achievement Validation. CSE Technical Report.
Ayala, Carlos Cuauhtemoc; Yin, Yue; Schultz, Susan; Shavelson, Richard
The focus in this study was on science achievement measures and their relationships to three reasoning dimensions: basic knowledge and reasoning, spatial-mechanical reasoning, and quantitative science reasoning. Thirty multiple-choice items, 8 constructed response items, and 3 performance assessments, each nominally assigned to 1 of the reasoning dimensions, were administered to 35 students, a representative sample of the whole study (n=341). It was found that the different measures of science achievement were moderately correlated with each other, suggesting that these measures tap into somewhat different aspects of science achievement, as expected. It was also found that the correlation patterns of student scores on items of like reasoning dimensions did not group as expected, and that student knowledge and experience seemed to suggest how a student solved a problem and not the problem alone. It is concluded that the nominal assignment of the items to three reasoning dimensions was problematic. An appendix shows performance assessment and reasoning dimensions according to M. Ruiz-Primo (1999). (Contains 9 tables and 29 references.) (Author/SLD)
UCLA/Center for the Study of Evaluation, 3-1 GSE&IS, Box 951522, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1522 ($4.50). Tel: 310-206-1532. For full text: http://www.cse.ucla.edu/CRESST/Reports/TR572.pdf.
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA.; Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for the Study of Evaluation.; Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing, Los Angeles, CA.
Note: An earlier version of this report was presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Seattle, WA, April 10-14, 2001). For related studies of the cognitive and motivational aspects of student test performance, see TM 034 512-514 and TM 539-541 (CSE Technical Reports 569-574).