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ERIC Number: ED469220
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2001-Nov
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Do Job Requirements and Work Conditions Interact with Individual Characteristics To Influence Teacher Attraction to the Principalship?
Newton, Rose Mary; Zeitoun, Peter
Policymakers have called for reinventing the principal's role because the long list of duties assigned to principals discourages potential applicants from applying for position vacancies. The focus of this study was to examine teachers' attraction to the principalship. Its purpose was to generate practical information that will inform efforts of policymakers engaged in reinventing the principal's role. A national sample of 239 randomly selected teachers rated position announcements for principal vacancies to generate data responsive to research questions. Results reveal that teacher reactions to the position announcements varied by gender and school size, with females and teachers employed in large schools being significantly less attracted to the job. Both males and females rated position announcements depicting a democratic leadership and a shorter work week more positively than they rated those depicting an authoritarian leadership style and a longer work week. It is recommended that organizational representatives wishing to increase the size of the applicant pool should both endorse the democratic approach to school administration and communicate this preference to prospective applicants. Women continue to represent a vast reservoir of untapped talent for leadership positions, begging the question of whether policymakers can reinvent the principalship in ways that appeal to women. (Contains 30 references and 2 tables.) (RT)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the University Council for Educational Administration (15th, Cincinnati, OH, November 2-4, 2001).