NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED469162
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2002-Apr
Pages: 17
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Critical Thinking, Belief Bias, Epistemological Assumptions, and the Minnesota Test of Critical Thinking.
Edman, Laird R. O.; Robey, Jennifer; Bart, William M.
The Minnesota Test of Critical Thinking-II (MTCT) has been designed to measure both critical thinking (CT) skills and the willingness to evaluate critically arguments that are congruent with one's own goals and beliefs. The MTCT uses a taxonomy of CT skills derived from the American Philosophical Association's definition of critical thinking. Participants were 232 college students at 3 institutions who were administered the MTCT, the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal, the Ennis-Weir Critical Thinking Essay Examination, three subtests of the Multi-Dimensional Aptitude Battery, the Epistemological Questionnaire, and a demographic questionnaire. Results of this study indicate that the MTCT may be a valuable instrument for assessing critical thinking skills. The reliability of the MTCT in this setting with these subjects was high, with the Cronbachs alpha scores for the MTCT higher than those reported for most major tests of CT in the literature. Also promising are the moderately high reliability indices for the subscale scores. Correlations of the scores on the MTCT with scores on the other tests administered are in the ranges hypothesized and support the concurrent validity of the test. However, the failure of the MTCT Bias subscale scores to relate meaningfully to any other measures in this study or the MTCT total score is discouraging, suggesting that this subscale does not measure anything of value. (Contains 3 tables and 39 references.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New Orleans, LA, April 1-5, 2002).