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ERIC Number: ED467090
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2002-May
Pages: 71
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Race, Place, and Opportunity: Racial Change and Segregation in the Boston Metropolitan Area, 1990-2000.
McArdle, Nancy
This paper examines patterns of racial change and segregation over the 1990s in the Boston metropolitan area and in three sub-areas, emphasizing whites, blacks, Asians, and Latinos. Soaring minority populations have transformed the city of Boston into a majority-minority urban core and made several satellite cities increasingly multiethnic. The suburbs have a great disparity between white and minority populations, with whites choosing suburban communities over cities. Eighty percent of the metro area's population growth occurred in the suburbs. While most of that growth was among whites, the suburban minority population also increased. Segregation rates between minorities and whites increased slightly, especially for Latinos. The city showed notable progress in reducing segregation, though segregation was still much higher than in the suburbs. The Boston metropolitan areas's child population was more heavily minority and more racially segregated than the population overall. Growth rates of minority homeowners equaled or outstripped even the rapid minority population increase. Segregation is worst for urban black homeowners but dramatically better for blacks in the suburbs and smaller cities. There is no evidence that neighborhoods that were moderately integrated in 1990 underwent dramatic racial change by 2000, though the city saw a substantial increase in multiethnic neighborhoods. Two data tables on the Boston Metro Area for the years 1990-2000 are appended: Change in Population by Race/Ethnicity; and Cities and Towns with Greatest Absolute Change in Population by Race. (Contains 17 figures). (SM)
Civil Rights Project, Harvard University, 124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 400 South, Cambridge, MA 02138. Tel: 617-496-6367; Fax: 617- 495-5210; e-mail: crp@harvard.edu; Web site: http://www.law.harvard.edu/civilrights/. For full text: http://www.civilrightsproject.harvard.edu/ research/metro/thr ee_metros.php.
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Harvard Civil Rights Project, Cambridge, MA.
Identifiers - Location: Massachusetts (Boston)