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ERIC Number: ED467088
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2002-Jul
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Early Exit: Understanding Adult Attrition in Accelerated and Traditional Postsecondary Programs. Synopsis: Higher Education Research Highlights.
Wlodkowski, Raymond J.; Mauldin, Jennifer; Campbell, Scott
This study was an attempt to provide information about the growing number of adult students who leave postsecondary education without a degree. Little has been done to improve the success rate of adult students, largely because so little information is available about why these students do not persist to graduation. The study looked at 295 students on two campuses, one accelerated (Regis University in Denver, Colorado) and one traditional (University of Missouri in Kansas City). In general, the study shows that adult students often leave college because they lack sufficient time or money to persist and succeed. To improve adults persistence rates, the study suggests increased financial aid and more services geared to the needs of adults: more weekend courses; more and better advising; and improved student interaction with faculty and peers. Appendixes to this report are available at the Lumina Foundation Web site. (Contains 14 references.) (SLD)
Lumina Foundation for Education, 30 South Meridian Street, Indianapolis, IN 46204-3503. Tel: 317-951-5704; Fax: 317-951-5063. For full text: http://www.luminafoundation.org/Publications/pdfs/_SynopsisJuly02.pdf. For full text of Exit Questionnaire: http://www.luminafoundation.org/Publications/pdfs/july02exitinternvewi.pdf. For full text of Phone Interview Questions: http://www.luminafoundation.org/pdfs/july02phoneinterview.pdf.
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Lumina Foundation for Education, Indianapolis, IN.
Note: Follow-up to larger study, Learning in the Fast Lane: Adult Learners Persistence and Success in Accelerated College Programs (see ED 459 317).