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ERIC Number: ED466814
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2002-Jun
Pages: 55
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Empty Promises: The Myth of College Access in America. A Report of the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance.
Ficklen, Ellen, Ed.; Stone, Jeneva E., Ed.
Because of record high financial barriers, nearly one-half of all college-qualified low- and moderate-income high school graduates, more than 400,000 students, will be unable to attend a four-year college in 2002, and 170,000 of these students will not be able to attend college at all. Over a decade, 4.4 million qualified students will not attend college. For the United States, this loss of human capital will exact a serious economic and social toll for much of the century. Throughout this decade, as school reform and early intervention efforts expand the number of college-qualified high school graduates, scarce grant aid will be stretched even further and work and loan burden for students will rise among current levels. This will produce even larger national losses of college-qualified high school graduates, and wider income-related gaps in college participation and degree completion for the foreseeable future. Reversing these trends will require a long-term commitment to increase grant aid at the federal, state, and institutional levels, strengthen student aid programs, and, at state and institutional levels, control college costs. All of these factors must be considered as the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act of 1965 approaches. One appendix lists members of the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance, and the other contains the authorizing legislation related to the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act of 1965. (Contains 18 figures, 27 endnotes, and 31 references.) (SLD)
For full text: http://www.ed.gov/offices/AC/ACSFA/emptypromises.pdf.
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance, Washington, DC.