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ERIC Number: ED465986
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2002
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Contribution of Morphology to Reading and Spelling Achievement.
Schwiebert, Catherine; Green, Laura; McCutchen, Deborah
A study examined the contribution of morphological knowledge to the reading and spelling achievement of fourth grade children. Results in the study were expected to indicate that morphology contributes to reading and spelling achievement beyond phonological and orthographic awareness. Participants were 58 native English-speaking fourth graders (88% were European American) from various public and private elementary schools in the Greater Seattle area. Participants, none of whom had reading disabilities, were selected from a larger group participating in a year-long study concerning the effects of phonological awareness instruction on literacy achievement. Participants were individually administered five tasks by one of four trained testers. Three subtests measuring the children's morphological awareness were administered, along with one task determining individual word identification ability and one task tapping phonological awareness. Except for word identification, all the tasks were presented orally--no reading was required. Findings suggest that morphology seems to contribute to the reading and spelling achievement of fourth-grade students. In particular, it seems to enhance performance on measures of word identification, spelling, vocabulary, and comprehension. Results indicated that morphological knowledge predicted reading and spelling achievement beyond orthographic and phonological awareness. Further study is needed to determine which aspects of written language achievement are most affected by morphological knowledge and when morphology begins to play a role in reading success. Includes 2 tables. Appended is a scoring of narratives rubric. (Contains 34 references.) (NKA)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Washington (Seattle)