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ERIC Number: ED465615
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2002-Jan
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Impacts of Contextual and Explicit Instruction on Preservice Elementary Teachers' Understandings of the Nature of Science.
Matkins, Juanita Jo; Bell, Randy; Irving, Karen; McNall, Rebecca
Science educators have identified the development of accurate understandings of the nature of science as an instruction goal for nearly a century. Unfortunately, science instructors are unlikely to focus on the nature of science in content courses and the nature of science lessons are generally relegated to the methods courses where they are typically presented out of context as an add-on to the science curriculum. When addressed in this manner, preservice teachers may see the nature of science as supplemental, rather than integral to their science instruction. The purposes of this study were to assess the influence of instruction on a controversial science and technology based issue (global climate change and global warming (GCC/GW)) on elementary preservice teachers' understandings of the nature of science and the relative effectiveness of an explicit approach versus an implicit approach to the nature of science instruction. A matrix of the nature of science and GCC/GW instructional treatments were employed over a period of four semesters to elementary preservice teachers in a elementary science methods course (n=75). The findings determined that in the semesters where nature of science was taught explicitly, the posttest responses reflected current understanding at a substantially higher rate than those of the pretest. (Contains 26 references.) (MVL)
For full text: http://aets.chem.pitt.edu.
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: In: Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (Charlotte, NC, January 10-13, 2002); see SE 066 324.