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ERIC Number: ED464786
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2002-Apr
Pages: 17
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Positive and Negative Ability Beliefs among Navajo High School Students: How Do They Relate to Students' School Achievement Goals?
Hinkley, John W.; McInerney, Dennis M.; Marsh, Herbert W.
This paper draws on the stereotype threat hypothesis and social identity theory to examine the influence of positive and negative ability beliefs on Navajo students' achievement goals. Data were collected on 829 Navajo students in two reservation high schools. The results support the notion that Navajo students hold both positive and negative ability beliefs about school; positive and negative ability factors were negatively correlated but only moderately, suggesting a more complex relationship than expected. Positive ability belief was positively correlated with mastery and performance approach factors and negatively correlated with the performance avoidance factor. Negative ability belief was positively correlated with the performance avoidance factor but was not related to the mastery and performance approach factors. Positive ability belief was positively related to grade point average and negatively related to absences; the reverse was found for negative ability belief. Positive ability belief was not related to gender or strength of social identity (traditionalism, as indicated by remote location and Navajo language use). The findings do not support the hypothesis that a stronger social identity results in more positive ability beliefs and greater academic achievement. (Contains 24 references.) (SV)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A