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ERIC Number: ED464160
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2001-Aug
Pages: 47
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-0-89940-753-6
ISSN: N/A
Ethnic Community Views of the Austin Independent School District. Policy Research Project Report.
Schott, Richard L.
This study examined ethnic community perceptions of the Austin Independent School District (AISD). It investigated citizens' assessments of the quality of public education, ethnic tensions in the schools, and the equality of resource distribution among the schools. It also examined variations in perceptions of the AISD by ethnic group. Data collection involved surveys and community interviews with white, Hispanic American, African American, Asian American, and other community members. Results indicated that public opinion about the AISD was mixed. One significant negative perception, which had greater consensus than any other topic explored, was that minority schools did not receive equal resources or treatment. Most citizens rated educational quality as poor or fair. Respondents with children attending AISD schools rated the quality of education higher than did people who did not have children in AISD schools. Children from lower socioeconomic status and minority group families were more likely to attend schools in AISD than children from higher socioeconomic status and white families. There was widespread perception that racial tensions existed among various ethnic groups in Austin schools. African Americans were the most alienated from AISD and the most critical of educational quality and distribution of resources. An appendix lists policy research project interviewees. (SM)
Office of Communications, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin, Box Y, Austin, TX 78713-8925. Tel: 512-471-4218; Web site: http://www.utexas.edu/lbj/pubs/.
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Texas Univ., Austin. Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs.