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ERIC Number: ED464114
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2002-Apr
Pages: 32
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
How the Multiple Functions of Grades Influence Their Validity and Value as Measures of Academic Achievement.
Lambating, Julita; Allen, James D.
This study explored the perspectives of high school students, high school teachers, undergraduate and graduate students in preservice teacher education programs, and university professors about how a high school teacher assigns grades. The study also asked whether these different groups gave more or less weight to completing an assigned task than demonstrating mastery of the subject in the assignment of grades and whether a stand-alone measurement course made a difference among educators' perspectives on grading. A survey was developed to collect perspectives through a case study of a realistic grading dilemma. Data were collected from 153 preservice teachers (mostly undergraduates), 49 preservice teachers in a graduate course, 81 practicing high school and elementary school teachers in 2 states, 34 education professors, and 288 high school students in 2 states. Participants responded in a similar way to the case study, but there was a difference in the perceptions of high school students and those of other groups. Educators and students agreed that homework as for practice, but most respondents would consider homework in grading the student. Generally respondents had similar views of the purpose of a grade. Educators who had taken a measurement course were more likely to consider homework as a requirement that should affect grading. Implications for teacher education are discussed. Appended are the survey instruments. (Contains 13 tables and 40 references.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New Orleans, LA, April 1-5, 2002).