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ERIC Number: ED463866
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2002-Jan
Pages: 57
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Connections: Tracking the Links between Jobs and Family. Job, Family and Stress among Husbands, Wives and Lone-Parents 15-64 from 1990 to 2000. Contemporary Family Trends.
Sauve, Roger
Noting that most reports on work-family relationships are based on limited data, this report attempts to establish a foundation for ongoing analysis of job and family patterns in Canada based on both historical and current labor force data and other sources. The report tracks and charts the connections between paid work and family trends for husbands, wives, and lone or single parents in Canada from 1990 to 2000. The focus of the report is on three types of trends: (1) participation of husband, wives, and single parents in the paid workforce; (2) how participation in the paid work force relates to job and family responsibilities; and (3) levels of stress reported by spouses and single parents. Part 1 of the report provides a summary of the major findings and policy implications, a review of the data sources, and an introduction to the topic. Data are derived from Statistics Canada sources. Part 2 of the report has been constructed as a chart book documenting 42 trends. Tables and charts provide a graphical or tabular presentation of the more important topics with comments included for each trend to help interpret the trend and to add additional insights. Findings are presented for wives with children, husbands with or without children, wives without children, and lone-parents. Among the main findings is that spouses share in the responsibilities for paid work and unpaid work. Husbands remain the main source of incomes from paid employment. More wives now work at jobs outside the home but they also retain the major responsibilities for child and family care, especially when young children are present. Wives work more total hours than their husbands do. The majority of spouses and single parents are not under severe stress but many are. (Contains 10 endnotes.) (KB)
Vanier Institute of the Family, 94 Centrepointe Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K2G 6B1, Canada ($10). Tel: 613-228-8500; Fax: 613-228-8007; e-mail: webmaster@vifamily.ca. For full text: http://www.vifamily.ca/cft/connect/connect.htm.
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Vanier Inst. of the Family, Ottawa (Ontario).
Identifiers - Location: Canada