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ERIC Number: ED461164
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1998-Jun
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Truth in Spending: The Cost of Not Educating Our Kids.
DeSchryver, David A.
Statistical information is given on the inadequacy of U.S. schools, including the cost of remedial classes in colleges and businesses. The relationship between money spent, including on such items as salaries and class size, and high achievement scores is shown to be uncertain. Low performance often leads to requests for more money, rather than a reform in how the money is used. Private schools are seen as a better model. Urban Catholic schools have demographic profiles similar to nearby public schools and, for less cost, obtain higher graduation rates. Districts have taken their states to court to demand equalized funding, though access to better education has not followed. Meanwhile, public schools have seen an increase in the number of administrators and educational regulations. Recent reforms are attempting to shift the control of resources to parents, requiring services that please parents and students so that the district keeps its funding. A per-pupil-based funding system, in which money would follow the child instead of the district, is now used in Arizona. Accountability is enhanced, and parents and their children become consumers. Private contractors for support services can save money. Charter schools in 33 states allow parents and children to design schools with fewer restrictions and regulations. Private companies, such as the Edison Project, can take over part or all of a school system with lower per-pupil costs and high success rates. (Contains 20 endnotes.) (RKJ)
Center for Education Reform, 1001 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 204, Washington, DC 20036. Tel: 202-822-9000; Fax: 202-822-5077.
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Center for Education Reform, Washington, DC.