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ERIC Number: ED458798
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2001-Mar
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Problems of Simultaneous Interpreting of Scientific Discussion.
Chachibaia, Nelly
This article focuses on the problems of simultaneous translation (SI) of scientific discussion at the Conference on Training Translators and Interpreters in the New Millennium, the development of which greatly depends on extralinguistic, external conference conditions. Text linguistics considers text not only as a grammatical unit larger than a sentence but also and mainly as a semantic unit, as a conveyer of meaning. Discussion is a very special text type. Its peculiarities arise from its oral and immediate nature. It differs from purely scientific language (characteristically objective, dispassionate, and the result of prior deliberation) and ordinary dialogue (characteristically emotionally colored, spontaneous, and having elliptical phrases). To interpret, one must understand. The message the interpreter receives and that he or she must understand in order to reconstruct it in the other language is transmitted in oral and spontaneous form. The process of SI is not a simple transformation of text from a source language (SL) into a target language (TL), but is a complex process. The fact that the recipient is both recipient and transmitter of the information simultaneously strongly influences the process of interpreting. The aim of this article is to show how the interpreter, as a low-knowledge individual, manages to establish unhampered communication between participants of a discussion speaking different languages; how he or she manages to produce a coherent bilingual text of a discussion. (KFT)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Conference on Training Translators and Interpreters in the New Millennium (Porthsmouth, England, United Kingdom, March 17, 2001).