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ERIC Number: ED457191
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2001-Aug
Pages: 35
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Investigation of the Effectiveness of the Mediation Portion of Two Subtests of the Application of Cognitive Functions Scale, a Dynamic Assessment Procedure for Young Children.
Malowitzky, Miriam
This study contributes to the research on the Application of Cognitive Functions Scale (ACFS) (C. Lidz and R. Jepsen, 2001), a new dynamic assessment approach for young children. Dynamic assessment is an assessment tool that follows a test-intervention-retest model, using the teaching as part of the assessment. The ACFS assesses the child's ability to apply cognitive functions to tasks that represent the learning processes necessary for school achievement. This study investigated the effects of mediation on the Pattern Sequencing subtest and the Visual Memory subtest of the ACFS. Participants were 30 preschool children aged 3 to 5 years. All were of Jewish backgrounds, and more than half came from families in which at least one parent had a Master's degree. Children were divided into control and experimental groups, with those in the experimental group receiving the intervention portion of the dynamic assessment. Results document the lack of practice effects for these participants. There were virtually no significant gains from pretest to posttest for the children not receiving mediation. The only group demonstrating a significant gain was the mediated group in its performance on the Pattern Completion subtest. The lack of significant gains on the Visual Memory subtest may be related to the fact that the study used children with typical development. Pretest scores were high, and posttest scores were close to the ceiling for the measure. Study results do suggest that the ACFS is a tool a school psychologist could use to make accurate assessments and productive educational plans. (Contains 30 references and 4 tables.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Masters Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A