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ERIC Number: ED456718
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2000-May
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Preliminary Findings: Faculty, Teaching Assistant, and Student Perceptions Regarding Accommodating Students with Disabilities in Postsecondary Environments.
Burgstahler, Sheryl; Duclos, Rachel; Turcotte, Michelle
Focus groups were conducted to inform and support the development of faculty, teaching assistant, and administrator training materials and strategies as part of the Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology (DO-IT) Prof project at the University of Washington, Seattle. Focus groups were conducted at the 23 postsecondary institutions in the DO-IT Prof project, which serves to improve the knowledge and skills of faculty related to the inclusion of students with disabilities. Twelve faculty focus groups involving 41 faculty members and 4 staff members examined experiences working with students with disabilities, problems, understanding of legal responsibilities, and perceptions of additional knowledge needed to serve students with disabilities. A focus group for teaching assistants (one group of four assistants) explored similar issues. Six student focus groups involving a total of 21 students with disabilities examined what students knew about existing services and their legal rights, their experiences with instructors, and other student concerns. The preliminary findings from these groups indicate that various training models are needed to meet the needs of a wide range of faculty, including workshops, reference materials, and longer seminars. Faculty and teaching assistants want information that focuses on accommodation methods rather than specific disabilities. Because of the range of student experiences and perceptions, an effective plan to institutionalize and integrate services and programs should include a needs assessment tailored for an individual campus. (Contains 19 references.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: The DO-IT project is funded by the U.S. Department of Education through Grant #P33A990042.