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ERIC Number: ED456552
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2001-Mar-22
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
An Exploratory Study of the Impact of Charter Schools on Reducing the White-Minority Achievement Gap in North Carolina.
Bingham, C. Steven; Harman, Patrick; Finney, Pamela; Hood, Art
An important challenge facing education today is the difference in academic achievement among students of different ethnic and racial backgrounds. This situation prompted a study to examine the impact of charter schools on North Carolina's white-minority achievement gap. Examination of test-score gaps between disadvantaged African-American minority and White students in regular North Carolina public schools provides a benchmark by which to examine the gap-reduction benefit of charter schools serving disadvantaged minorities. Because of the quantitative-descriptive research design used and variables such as poverty level, learning disabilities, and behavioral and emotional handicaps not controlled for, no inferences can be drawn from study results that charter schools reduce the achievement gap. Study results show that charter-school student achievement varies at least as widely as it does in regular district public schools. However, six charter schools demonstrated reduced achievement gaps, suggesting the need for further research, be done to explore why, and why at so few schools. No recommendations can be made to policymakers and practitioners at this time because of the exploratory nature of this study. The report includes 15 references, 2 figures, and 8 tables. (RT)
Program on Education Leadership, SERVE, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, P.O. Box 5367, Greensboro, NC 27435.
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: SERVE: SouthEastern Regional Vision for Education.
Identifiers - Location: North Carolina