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ERIC Number: ED455720
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2001-May
Pages: 35
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Overcoming the High School Senior Slump: New Education Policies. Perspectives in Public Policy: Connecting Higher Education and the Public Schools.
Kirst, Michael W.
The slump experienced by many high school seniors stems in part from the failure of the K-12 school system and colleges and universities to provide incentives for high school seniors to work hard. Senior slump appears to be the rational response of students to some disjunctions between the K-12 and postsecondary systems, including a lack of assessment in grade 12, a college admissions calendar that provides little incentive for seniors to take demanding courses, a lack of coherence and sequencing between the K-12 system and colleges, and the emphasis on access and admission to college rather than preparation for completing college. Recommendations in this report are geared toward reclaiming the senior year as a time of serious work. These policy suggestions focus on: (1) strengthening the high school curriculum and linking it to the general education requirement of the first year of college; (2) recognizing various achievement levels on statewide K-12 assessments that meet college or university standards; (3) improving college admissions and placement priorities; and (4) assigning responsibilities for K-16 issues to a single entity in each state. An appendix discusses findings from Stanford University's Bridge Project. (Contains 1 table and 20 references.) (SLD)
Institute for Educational Leadership, 1001 Connecticut Ave., N.W., Suite 310, Washington, DC 20036 ($15). Tel: 202-822-8405.
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, PA.; Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Institute for Educational Leadership, Washington, DC.; National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, CA.
Note: Prepared for the National Commission on the Senior Year in High School.