NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED455518
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2001
Pages: 18
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Before Brother Fought Brother: Life in the North and South, 1847-1861.
More Americans lost their lives in the Civil War than in any other conflict. The question is how the United States arrived at the point at which the South seceded and some families were so fractured that brother fought brother. A complex series of events led to the Civil War. The lessons in this unit are designed to help students develop a foundation on which to understand the basic disagreements between the North and the South before the Civil War. In these lessons, through the examination of primary source documents from the mid-1800's--photographs, census information, and other archival documents--students can gain an appreciation of everyday life in the North and the South, changes occurring in the lives of ordinary Americans, and some of the major social and economic issues of the years just before the Civil War. The lesson plan contains guiding questions and material on how to prepare to teach the lesson. It also contains suggested activities for the following lessons: Lesson 1: Important Enough To Fight About; Lesson 2: Making a Living; Lesson 3: Take My Census, Please; Lesson 4: Cities North and South; Lesson 5: The Lives of African-Americans: A Debate against Slavery; Lesson 6: Presenting Life before the Civil War; and Extending the Lesson. The lesson plan provides detailed information and ideas for teaching each lesson; cites learning objectives; gives appropriate grade levels and approximate length of time required for each lesson; and outlines national standards for social studies, geography, civics and government, and language arts covered in the lessons. Lists 13 related Internet links to Web sites. (NKA)
For full text: http://edsitement.neh.gov/lessonplans.html.
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners; Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.; Council of the Great City Schools, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A