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ERIC Number: ED455389
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2001-Jun-27
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Nursing Workforce: Multiple Factors Create Nurse Recruitment and Retention Problems. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, Restructuring and the District of Columbia, Committee on Governmental Affairs, U.S. Senate.
Heinrich, Janet
Current evidence suggests emerging shortages of nurses available or willing to fill some vacant positions in hospitals, nursing homes, and home care. The nationwide unemployment rate for registered nurses (RNs), which has been low for many years, has declined to 1.0 percent, the lowest level in more than a decade. Nurses report job dissatisfaction relating to a variety of issues, including staffing, respect and recognition, and wages, and this dissatisfaction is affecting their decision to work in nursing. Furthermore, the nurse workforce is aging, and fewer new nurses are entering the profession to replace those who are retiring or leaving. A serious shortage of nurses is expected in the future as pressures are exerted on demand and supply. Demand is expected to increase dramatically when the baby boomers reach their 60s, 70s, and beyond. During the same period, the number of women aged 25-54, who have traditionally formed the core of the nurse workforce, is expected to remain relatively unchanged. Job dissatisfaction due to management decisions to restructure health care delivery and staffing may play a crucial role in determining the extent of future nursing shortages. More data is needed to assist in planning and targeting remedies. (YLB)
U.S. General Accounting Office, P.O. Box 37050, Washington, DC 20013 (first copy free; additional copies $2 each). For full text: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d01912t.pdf.
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.
Note: For related reports on the Nursing Workforce, see CE 081 941 and CE 082 000.