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ERIC Number: ED453746
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2000-Nov
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
An Examination of First-Time in College Freshmen Attrition within the First Year of Attendance.
Fredda, Jeffrey V.
This report updates research on first-time in college freshmen (cohort) attrition at Nova Southeastern University. The purpose was to determine the extent of attrition among these students and to see if there was a profile of students more likely to leave. After one semester, 13% (36 of 280 first time in college students) in fall 1999 dropped out. One third of the entering cohort dropped out (93 cumulative dropouts) after the first academic year. This 1-year attrition rate is comparable to the mean first year attrition rate at Nova Southeastern University from 1991 through 1995. These retention rates are consistent with other private institutions with similar selection criteria (Scholastic Assessment Test score above 990 or ACT Assessment above 21). A followup of the dropouts will be conducted within 2 years to determine re-enrollment rates. The most substantial finding was that students with lower grade point averages in either high school or college and those enrolled part-time dropped out at the greatest rates. There was not a substantial difference in the proportion of males and females that dropped out. Nor was college major change status related to attrition. White and minority students dropped out at similar rates. The failure to retain these students has a substantial impact on Nova Southeastern University's income. The University should make the retention of students an increasing priority. An appendix contains detailed tables of data about segments of the student cohort. (Contains 10 tables and 3 figures.) (SLD)
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Nova Southeastern Univ., Ft. Lauderdale, FL. Research and Planning.