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ERIC Number: ED452009
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2001
Pages: 45
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Native American Perceptions of the National Association for Native American Children of Alcoholics: In Their Own Words.
Johnson, Jeannette L.; Plemons, Bradford W.; Starr, Edward; Reyes, Raymond; Fleming, Candace; Latimer, Anna; Trimble, Joseph E.
The National Association for Native American Children of Alcoholics (NANACOA) initiated a strategy in 1995 to evaluate their programs and prevention efforts. The design and methodology of the project incorporated a "naturalistic" approach to help preserve cultural integrity and respect multiple perspectives. Data were gathered from archival sources, 50 personal interviews and 12 focus groups. One powerful theme traced the negative effects of substance abuse in participants' communities, including the generational transmission of substance abuse behavior; the damage it caused to families, friends, community, and culture; and its link to child abuse. The importance of culture, spirituality, and tradition was stressed in counteracting these negative effects. Participants stated that NANACOA realized the importance of culture by encouraging pride in one's ethnic identity, stressing the importance of rediscovering Native ways, and affirming the importance of culture in the healing journey. Several participants stressed the importance of support from family, friends, community, and staff members in maintaining a sober lifestyle. NANACOA was described as an organization that promoted healing and self-care, encouraged learning, and served as a source of support and empowerment. Recommendations for how NANACOA could better serve Native Americans included making conferences and workshops more affordable, including elders in conference programming, having a separate youth track, coming to reservations and smaller communities, and having regional representation. (Contains 22 references.) (TD)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A