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ERIC Number: ED451893
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2001-Apr-21
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Goals, Activities, and Reflections of Inner-City Adolescents: A Follow-Up Comparison of Early Childhood Models.
Marcon, Rebecca A.
Noting that research on long-term effects of attending preschool has found social as well as cognitive effects, this study explored the association between preschool participation and adolescent goals and activities in a sample of 80 urban eighth graders who had attended different types of preschool and kindergarten programs. The sample was 55 percent female; 94 percent of the sample were African American. Most students (76 percent) qualified for subsidized school lunch based on low family income, and 70 percent lived in single-parent families. Students were individually interviewed using a modified version of the Youth Follow-Up Interview. Subjects reported that the hardest adjustment in the transition to junior high school was the new school routine, followed by adjusting to a new physical environment, and making new friends. Findings indicated that these inner city students were highly involved in the typical activities of early adolescence. Their educational and career aspirations were high. More adolescents involved in extracurricular activities hoped to complete college. Few had violated rules of their community, and all had accomplished something that made them proud. Adolescents who had attended preschool were more likely than those who had not to be proud of themselves for achievement-related reasons and, of those, graduates of child-initiated preschools were most likely to report prosocial reasons for feeling proud. Graduates of teacher-directed, academic early childhood programs had somewhat lower postsecondary aspirations, were less likely to participate in sports, and were the only ones to report intentional violation of community rules. (KB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Poster session presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (Minneapolis, MN, April 21, 2001).