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ERIC Number: ED450284
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2001
Pages: 4
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Career Exploration by Adults. Practice Application Brief No. 14.
Kerka, Sandra
In an era of rapid social and economic changes, the demand for adult career exploration services is growing in career-tech and one-stop centers and community college and university reentry programs. Career exploration is a process of acquiring self-knowledge and career knowledge and using this knowledge to formulate plans and prepare for a career. It is a learning process embedded in a larger context of growth and development, often triggered by life events such as divorce or job layoff. Career exploration is different for adults than for children and adolescents, since adults have a pool of life and work experiences to bring to the process, and adults make more pragmatic education and career decisions based on the circumstances of their lives. Adults who engage in career exploration are more driven by natural curiosity, initiative, adaptability, and the ability to overcome uncertainty and fear, while exploratory activity may be hindered by self-criticism, insecurity, and guilt. These external resources also influence career exploration: resistance or encouragement from family, friends, and supervisors; financial resources; and role models and mentors. Adult educators, human resource development specialists, and career development practitioners can help adults to develop new skills and knowledge to make career transitions. They can provide support for career transitions. Techniques that professionals can use to help adults explore careers include "possible selves"; the "Discovery Path" workshop for women; experiential activities; and more traditional career exploration activities, such as assessment tools and researching. (Contains 21 references.) (KC)
For full text: http://www.ericacve.org/fulltext.asp.
Publication Type: Information Analyses; ERIC Publications
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education, Columbus, OH.