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ERIC Number: ED449914
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2000-Apr
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Year after Columbine: Public Looks to Parents More than Schools To Prevent Violence.
Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, Washington, DC.
An April 2000 telephone survey queried a nationwide sample of 1,000 adults, including 283 parents of children ages 5 to 17 years, concerning school violence and other issues in the news. The vast majority of those surveyed said they believe it is the responsibility of parents to ensure that school shootings, such as occurred at Columbine High School, are not repeated. Approximately 70 percent of parents said that the Columbine violence has had some impact on their feelings about the safety of their children at school. Eighty-five percent of adults placed the responsibility for preventing future school violence incidents in the hands of parents. Attitudes on gun control remained unchanged from a year earlier, with 66 percent saying that controlling gun ownership was more important than protecting Americans' rights to own guns. Gender and political party differences remain. The majority indicated that more jobs and community programs for young people would reduce violent crime and that it is more important to enforce existing gun laws than to enact new statutes. Sixty percent said they believe that paying more attention to children with antisocial attitudes would be more effective than increasing school security, passing stricter gun control laws, or reducing violence in popular entertainment. Parents are split on what they think is the main reason youth commit violent acts, with about one-third each stating that parental upbringing or media violence is at fault. (A tabulation of survey responses for each question is attached.) (KB)
For full text: http://www.people-press.org/april00rpt.htm.
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, Washington, DC.