NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED449335
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2000-Apr
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Family Skills Training for Parents and Children. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.
Kumpfer, Karol L.; Tait, Connie M.
Originally designed as a drug abuse prevention program for drug-abusing parents and their children, the Strengthening Families Program (SFP) has developed into a family-change program. Presented in 14 2-hour-long, consecutive weekly sessions, SFP has two versions: for elementary school children and their parents and for parents and youth 10-14 years of age. Each includes skills training for parents, children, and families. The curriculum has six manuals, with separate versions for African American families. Parent skills training covers developmental expectancies and stress management; rewards; goals and objectives; differential attention; communication; alcohol, drugs, and families; problem solving, giving directions; limit setting; and behavior program. Children's skills training addresses social skills; creating good behavior; how to say "no" to stay out of trouble; communication; alcohol and drugs; problem solving; and coping skills. Family skills training covers most parent skills plus these: learning from parents; giving commands; consequences; and family talks. Twelve research studies have demonstrated SFP's effectiveness. Additional SFP replication studies are: Alabama's rural and urban African American SFPs; Utah community youth activity project; Strengthening Hawaii Families Program; Strengthening Hispanic Families Program; and Iowa's SFP. Suggestions for implementation address recruiting and retaining high-risk families; program site, location, and group size; and facilitators' training. (Contains 28 references.) (YLB)
For full text: http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/180140.pdf.
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Parents; Students
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.