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ERIC Number: ED447399
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2000-Aug
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Interests and Career Preparation of Professional Psychology Doctoral Students.
Meyers, Steven A.; Kvall, Steven A.; Byers, Kristie; Vega, Natalie; Wedell, Amy; Hichcox, Nanette; Higgins, Sean
This paper considers whether professional psychology programs are adequately preparing graduate students for post-doctoral careers in light of recent changes in the profession. It describes a national survey to assess the perceived adequacy of the preparation that clinical, counseling, and school psychology doctoral students receive for their postgraduate careers. Students (N=882) enrolled in clinical, counseling, and school psychology doctoral programs were surveyed to explore their career interests; satisfaction with preparation provided by their coursework and supervision; and their perceptions of their preparation for work in different professional settings. The survey determined that students' professional interests tended to shift as they progressed through graduate school towards both research and teaching. Graduate students' ultimate interest in research and college teaching was significantly associated with perceived quality of their coursework and supervision. Doctoral students generally believed that their coursework provided them with a good foundation for their postdoctoral careers, however certain courses were viewed as significantly more helpful than others. Clinical Psy.D. students rated their coursework as more relevant to their careers than both clinical and counseling Ph.D. students. Towards the end of their doctoral studies, students from all programs felt more prepared to enter a career in clinical work rather than academia. (Author/JDM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the American Psychological Association (108th, Washington, DC, August 4-8, 2000).