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ERIC Number: ED446871
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2000-May
Pages: 41
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Leaping into Social Skill Success.
Grossi, Karyn; Habich, Jessica; Hackett, Megan; Petersen, Allison
Many children today are entering classrooms without the ability to interact effectively with others; this is often the result of inexperience with social settings. Without proper guidance, these children may become aggressive and disruptive, and are at risk for low self- esteem, poor mental health, dropping out of school, low achievement, poor employment history, and many other difficulties. This action research project implemented and evaluated a program to teach social skills to improve the capacity of primary age students to cooperatively work, learn, and play both inside and outside a school setting. Participants were students in two kindergarten classrooms, one second grade class and one third grade class. The 12-week intervention consisted of teaching and reinforcing 4 targeted social skills--forming groups quietly, listening to the speaker, using low voices, and thinking for oneself. Researchers introduced each lesson by modeling the pro- social behavior followed by an interactive activity in which students practiced the skill. During the final 6 weeks, researchers observed, and reviewed the desired social skills as necessary. Findings of the post-observation checklist indicated an improvement in all four social skill areas. The most considerable difference was observed in students' ability to form groups quietly. It was anticipated that as a result of these interventions, students would gain a sense of belonging and self-worth. (Eight appendices include teacher survey form and findings, observation checklists, and outlines of the four social skills lessons.) (HTH)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Master of Arts Action Research Project, Saint Xavier University and Skylight Professional Development.