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ERIC Number: ED445518
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2000
Pages: 33
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Children's Learning Strategies in Language Immersion Classrooms.
Chamot, Anna Uhl; El-Dinary, Pamela Beard
This paper reports on an investigation of learning strategy applications in elementary foreign language immersion classrooms. The focus of the paper is on identifying strategies more and less effective learners use for classroom reading and writing tasks in the target language. Think-aloud data from third grade and fourth grade students were quantified and compared through matched pair t-tests. Although there were no differences in total strategies used by high- and low-rated students, there were some differences in the types of strategies relied on when reading. Low students used a greater proportion of phonetic decoding than high students. High students used a higher proportion of background-knowledge strategies (including inferences, predictions, and elaborations) than did low students. Potential differences in the quality and flexibility of students' strategies use are expected. Conclusions include the following: good learners may better monitor and adapt strategies, whereas poor learners cling to ineffective strategies; effective learners recognized the need for strategic flexibility; less effective learners may get bogged down in details, whereas more effective learners focus on the task as a whole. A "Coding Reference/Index"; a "Sample Tally Sheet for Recording Strategy Codes"; "Descriptive Profile" form; and a "General Information/Global Impressions" sheet are appended. 25 references. (Author/KFT)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Department of Education, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: National Capital Language Resource Center, Washington, DC.
Note: Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, International Research and Studies Program. National Capital Language Resource Center was formerly the National Foreign Language Resource Center.