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ERIC Number: ED444713
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2000-Jun-29
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The 1999 National Survey of Child Development Associates (CDAs).
Bredekamp, Sue; Bailey, Caryn T.; Sadler, Allen
The Child Development Associate (CDA) National Credentialing Program is a national system to improve the professional competence of early childhood teaching staff. This report presents the findings of the 1999 national survey to assess the impact of credentialing on individuals' careers and professional development. A sample of 4,993 CDAs was randomly selected from those credentialed in five selected years (1998, 1997, 1996, 1993, 1989), yielding three groups for comparison: (1) recently credentialed; (2) mid-level; and (3) veteran. The response rate was approximately 20 percent. The major findings indicate that half the respondents received the CDA between 26 and 40 years of age. Respondents were more diverse with regard to race/ethnicity than the U.S. population as a whole. Thirty percent had been Head Start parents. Over 40 percent had some college education at time of credentialing, with all groups tending to attain degrees after credentialing. There was an increase in the percentage who were teachers or held supervisory positions between the time of credentialing and the survey. Increases in salary over time were reported by all groups. Most respondents reported receiving training through coursework, pre- or inservice training, and continuing education units. Over 60 percent reported not having to pay for any portion of their CDA training, with the percentage receiving financial support decreasing over the past 10 years. Changes directly linked to credentialing were most often increased salary or promotions. Seventy-seven percent of veterans were still in early childhood education, compared to 81 percent of mid-level group, and 90 percent of new CDAs. (KB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Council for Professional Recognition, Washington, DC.