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ERIC Number: ED443518
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2000-Mar
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Adolescents' Relationships with Parents and Friends: Age Differences in Emotional Tone and Degree of Influence.
Tillman, Jamie N.; Chadha, Jagdeep S.; Zhe, Elizabeth J.; Farwell, Lisa J.; Mrozak, Kate C.; Nuijens, Karen; Zook, Joan M.; Repinski, Daniel J.
This study examined the emotional tone and degree of influence in adolescents' relationships with parents and friends. Early adolescent relationships were compared to middle adolescent relationships, and at both ages, relationships with mothers, fathers, and friends were compared. Using a self-report questionnaire, seventh- and tenth-grade adolescents rated the degree to which they were influenced by their mothers, fathers, and best friends and the frequency with which they experienced positive and negative emotions in their relationships with them. Compared to tenth-graders, seventh-graders reported stronger influence, more frequent positive emotions, and less frequent negative emotions in relationships with parents. There were no grade differences in the degree of influence or the frequency of experiencing positive or negative emotions in relationships with friends. The frequency with which seventh-graders experienced positive emotions in relationships with friends did not differ from the frequency with which they experienced positive emotions in relationships with mothers and fathers. Tenth-graders, however, experienced fewer positive emotions in relationships with fathers than in relationships with friends. Both seventh- and tenth-graders reported more negative emotions in relationships with parents than with friends. Mothers' and fathers' influence was stronger than that of friends for seventh-graders, but only mothers continued to be more influential than friends in the tenth grade. (Contains 18 references.) (Author/EV)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association (Baltimore, MD, March 2000).