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ERIC Number: ED442884
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2000-Jun
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Turbulence and Child Well-Being. New Federalism: National Survey of America's Families, Series B, No. B-16. Assessing the New Federalism: An Urban Institute Program To Assess Changing Social Policies.
Moore, Kristin Anderson; Vandivere, Sharon; Ehrle, Jennifer
The 1997 National Survey of America's Families (NSAF) asked parents of 6- to 17-year-olds several questions in order to assess the degree of turbulence or stability in a child's life. Turbulence was associated with several types of change, including moves and multiple school changes. The NSAF is a survey of more than 44,000 families, representing a national sample and the populations of 13 states, conducted as part of the Assessing the New Federalism project. A child who experienced two or more of the defined changes during the prior 12 months was classified as experiencing turbulence. Nationwide in 1997, 6% of all children experienced turbulence as defined for this study. When children are compared by family income, welfare receipt, family structure, and parental education, it becomes apparent that turbulence is much more prevalent in poor families than it is in moderate- or higher-income families. Fourteen percent of children in families that received Aid to Families with Dependent Children experienced high levels of turbulence in their lives. Nine percent of children who lived in one-parent families experienced turbulence, compared with 5% of children in two-parent families. Children who had experienced turbulence were also more likely than other children to have high levels of emotional and behavioral problems. There is considerable variation across states in the percentages of children who have experienced high levels of turbulence, with a high of 9% in Florida. Evidence from the NSAF indicates that turbulence is associated with poorer outcomes for children. (Contains 1 table, 5 figures, and 22 references.) (SLD)
Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037. Tel: 202-261-5687; Web site: http://www.urban.org.
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD.; Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek, MI.; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, NJ.; Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Menlo Park, CA.; Ford Foundation, New York, NY.; John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Chicago, IL.; Mott (C.S.) Foundation, Flint, MI.; David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Los Altos, CA.; McKnight Foundation, Minneapolis, MN.; Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY.; Weingart Foundation, Los Angeles, CA.; Fund for New Jersey, East Orange.; Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, Milwaukee, WI.; Joyce Foundation, Chicago, IL.; Rockefeller Foundation, New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: Urban Inst., Washington, DC.; Child Trends, Inc., Washington, DC.
Note: Additional support provided by the Stuart Fundation.