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ERIC Number: ED439506
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2000-Jan
Pages: 3
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Earmarking Lottery Funds for Instructional Materials. EdSource Election Brief, Proposition 20.
EdSource, Inc., Palo Alto, CA.
This article outlines the provisions and summarizes the arguments for and against "The Cardenas Textbook Act of 2000" (Proposition 20). This Proposition amends California's Code to give half of any increase in public education's share of lottery proceeds to school districts and community colleges. Since its approval in 1984, California's state lottery has allocated at least 34 percent of its annual receipts to public education. However, none of the money may be used for school facilities, research, or any other noninstructional purpose. The impact of Proposition 20 will depend on how much lottery funds will increase. Because the increase in funds for K-14 education is relatively small, the primary issue voters must decide is whether they want monies earmarked for instructional materials. The current state budget already includes support for instructional materials but proponents for the proposition argue that the state has a textbook shortage, ranking 47th nationally in textbook spending per pupil. Opponents of the measure point out that more and more money is being earmarked for specific purposes, and many school districts prefer to fit their expenditures to local circumstances and needs. Future allocations under Proposition 20 would depend on increased (or decreased) total lottery proceeds and the annual growth of the student population. (RJM)
EdSource, 4151 Middlefield Rd., Suite 100, Palo Alto, CA 94303-4743. Tel: 650-857-9604; Fax: 650-857-9618; e-mail: edsource@edsource.org; Web site: http://www.edsource.org.
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: EdSource, Inc., Palo Alto, CA.
Identifiers - Location: California