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ERIC Number: ED438046
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1999-Dec
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Human Cost of Waiting for Child Care: A Study.
Coltoff, Philip; Torres, Myrna; Lifton, Natasha
This study sought to put a human face on child care finances in New York City by documenting the everyday struggles of low-income working families, and those making the transition from welfare to work, who are unable to obtain good quality, stable child care. The Children's Aid Society surveyed 150 parents on child care waiting lists maintained by established community-based child care agencies. Specific findings were: (1) 77 percent of families believed that their current child care situations were negatively affecting their children; (2) over 70 percent of families used an unregulated child care arrangement; (3) 49 percent of families with incomes of $6,000 to $12,000 spent between 20 and 50 percent of their income on child care; (4) 36 percent of parents said they were either unable to work or had lost their jobs, 20 percent said they had been late or missed work, and 16 percent went on public assistance because of lack of quality child care; (5) 64 percent of parents said they wanted child care that emphasized education and school readiness skills; (6) families participating in welfare-to-work activities did not know about their rights to a range of subsidized child care options and the availability of transitional child care benefits once they left welfare for work; and (7) many low-income working families did not know that they were eligible for a child care subsidy, nor that the Agency for Child Development exists and is the primary city agency responsible for providing child care assistance. Based on the findings, recommendations to improve the quality of child care in New York City were devised, including: (1) additional child care funding must be used to expand the supply of regulated, high quality child care; and (2) a single agency should administer all child care subsidies in the city. (EV)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Children's Aid Society, New York, NY.
Identifiers - Location: New York (New York)