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ERIC Number: ED437888
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1999-Oct
Pages: 30
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Doing Comparatively Well: Why the Public Loves Higher Education and Criticizes K-12. Perspectives in Public Policy: Connecting Higher Education and the Public Schools.
Immerwahr, John
This report, drawing on a wide variety of public opinion data, is the first to compare public perceptions of K-12 and higher education. Differences in perceptions are discussed in seven categories: (1) knowledge of the systems; (2) perceptions of their quality; (3) assignment of responsibility between students and the institutions; (4) who pays for the costs; (5) safety, discipline, and dealing with basic learning; (6) who has access; and (7) understanding of the alternatives of privatization, vouchers, and charter schools. The report does not examine the accuracy of the reported perceptions. The report concludes that higher education still is viewed as different and better than K-12, and that it is immune to many of the criticisms leveled at K-12. However, there are some signs of erosion in higher education's stronger position; leadership groups, especially business executives, are equally critical of both systems, with a shared concern that K-12 schools are not adequately preparing students for higher education. These leaders, aware that K-12 educators feel that colleges are not adequately training teachers, believe that K-12 and higher education must work together more closely. (Contains 26 endnotes.) (RH)
Institute for Educational Leadership, 1001 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036 (single copies, $15; 10-24 copies $12 each; 25 or more copies $9 each). Tel: 202-822-8405; Fax: 202-872-4050; e-mail: iel@iel.org; Web site: http://www.iel.org.
Publication Type: Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Public Agenda Foundation, New York, NY.; Institute for Educational Leadership, Washington, DC.; National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, CA.