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ERIC Number: ED437534
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1998
Pages: 6
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Gaining Commitment To Change through Career Coaching.
Stevens, Paul
With employees in many organizations now expected to act as if they are self-employed in order to preserve their employability, managers need to assume new responsibilities to provide career coaching. Some outputs of career coaching are education of staff in career self-management, guidance of staff in the use of career analysis and planning methods, staff taking career enrichment initiatives, and information input by staff into their manager's succession planning. Managers' roles in career support include the following seven activities: (1) being available for both informal and informal discussions with employees about their careers; (2) appraising employees' performance and providing advice regarding their strengths and development needs; (3) guiding employees through their career planning process; (4) providing information that will assist employees to develop career plans or access information they need in order to understand what options are available to them; (5) making employees available for planned career moves that will help the organization to meet its resourcing requirements; (6) ensuring that the appropriate skills are developed within the organization to meet current and future needs; and (7) tracking the trends within the industry and employees' occupations in order to provide meaningful advice and guidance. In order to be effective coaches, managers must learn how to do their own career planning first. Career coaching processes are most successful when they originate from employees and are respectful of their needs. The more that managers can educate and support their employees to take responsibility for their own careers, the more likely they are to develop productive and motivated work teams. (KC)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Centre for Worklife Counselling, Sydney (Australia).