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ERIC Number: ED435858
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1998-Nov
Pages: 38
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Saving Teenage Lives: The Case for Graduated Driver Licensing.
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.
This manual explains what graduated driver licensing (GDL) is and why the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration believes it is so important for every jurisdiction to take steps towards its implementation. Section I introduces the need by defining the teen driving problem: inexperience, risk-taking behavior and immaturity, and greater risk exposure. Section II compares the traditional licensing process with the GDL process, which includes three stages: learner's permit, intermediate license (or provisional license or junior license), and full license (or unrestricted license). For each stage, minimum eligibility requirements, core components, and recommended components are outlined. Section III explains how GDL has been shown to be effective by expanding the learning process, reducing risk exposure, improving driving proficiency, and enhancing motivation for safe driving. Examples of how the community can promote GDL and questions and answers on GDL are provided. Section IV presents research results from three states (Maryland, California, and Oregon) that have evaluated the effect of their GDL on teen crashes and traffic convictions. Experiences in New Zealand and Ontario, Canada, are also reported. Section V focuses on support for GDL from the public at large, teen drivers, and parents. Section VI makes the argument for states' adoption of GDL. Appendixes include a model law; characteristics of selected U.S. licensing laws; teen crash statistics; federal, regional, state, and private sector organization resources; and 11 resources. A brochure with questions and answers on GDL is provided. (YLB)
Publication Type: Reports - General
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.