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ERIC Number: ED435823
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1999
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Strategies for the 21st Century: Integrating Technology into the ABLE Environment.
Mingle, Mary E. H.
Integrating technology into the Adult Basic Literacy Education (ABLE) classroom can be very helpful to students and teachers, but it requires a shift in the teacher's role. The idea of "delivering" instruction--teacher-centered classes or tutor-directed lessons--should be replaced with student-centered, self-paced learning. Although the first lessons need to be teacher centered as basic instruction is given, online tutorials can be used to help students acquire the basic skills needed to use technology. Following the acquisition of basic skills, teachers can construct activities and suggest learning games that reinforce classroom learning and aid in the acquisition of real-life skills with immediate rewards. Once students have mastered these skills, they may start to acquire additional skills on their own through the Internet, focusing on the things they need to know. In addition, technology can be used in the instructional setting to develop critical thinking, problem-solving, communication, and collaboration skills. Ideas for using technology in the classroom include the following: asking students to create original sentences incorporating vocabulary words by using a word-processing program; using an encyclopedia on CD-ROM to learn more about a person featured in a story the students have read; arranging e-mail pen pal correspondence with an ABLE program in another area; having the class publish a program newsletter; using interactive Internet Web sites to help students analyze their diet; and asking students to use a word processing program to write journal entries. (The document contains 33 resources, including articles, online tutorials, games, virtual classrooms, free e-mail, and Web sites.) (KC)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners; Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A