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ERIC Number: ED434204
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1999-Apr
Pages: 33
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Transition and Skills Development through Education, Training and Work Experiences: A Follow-up Study, Seven Oaks School Division.
Taylor, Lynn; Simpson, Wayne; McClure, Karen; Graham, Barbara; Levin, Benjamin
A Canadian study of the school-to-work transition followed students enrolled in grade 11 in 1990 (n=177), 1992 (n=172), and 1994 (n=347) in Seven Oaks School Division's three high schools. Based largely on questions from the Statistics Canada (SC) School Leavers Survey and SC Graduates Study (1997), the telephone survey focused on these elements: background and demographic variables; high school experience; post-high school employment and education; skills used in current employment; and perceptions of where particular skills were acquired. A preliminary path analysis revealed significant variables contributing to high school and postsecondary experiences, skill development and use, and workplace outcomes. Cohorts differed notably in factors contributing to attainment at high school and postsecondary levels. Gender differences existed at the high school level on a range of outcomes from grades, completion rates, and goal setting; gender was not a significant factor contributing to postsecondary enrollment and completion. Background factors were more important predictors of economic and educational outcomes than participation in a particular educational program. Males made more money than females, and a postsecondary credential was associated with permanent employment and pay satisfaction. Communication skills were consistently rated most important in current jobs, and working with others was rated second most important. On-the-job learning and general life experience were viewed as important to development of all skill areas more frequently than were secondary or postsecondary education. (Contains 29 references.) (YLB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).
Authoring Institution: N/A