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ERIC Number: ED433362
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1999-Jun
Pages: 51
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Synthesizing the Effects of Test Accommodations for Special Education and Limited English Proficient Students.
Chiu, Christopher W. T.; Pearson, P. David
Test accommodations for special education (SP) and limited English proficient (LEP) students have attracted much attention recently because proper accommodations promote inclusion and allow students to perform optimally. A meta-analysis of 30 research studies found empirical evidence supporting the position that, with appropriate accommodations, SP and LEP students can increase their scores on standardized achievement tests. Compared to conditions of no accommodation, students increased their scores by an average of 0.16 standard deviation. Relative to general education students, accommodated SP and LEP students demonstrated an average accommodation advantage of 0.10 standard deviation. Interpretations of these average effects require careful analyses because of the variety of accommodations, the specific status of the students, and the varying implementations of the accommodations. Providing additional time or unlimited time is the most frequently investigated accommodation. Other accommodations investigated were assistive devices, presentation formats, response formats, test settings, radical accommodations, and combinations of accommodations. Age did not seem to be a factor; elementary and postsecondary students benefited from accommodations. Narrative descriptions are given of the situations in which positive and negative effects of accommodation appear to emerge. An appendix lists and summarizes the studies analyzed. (Contains 63 references.) (Author/SLD)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the National Conference on Large Scale Assessment (Snowbird, UT, June 13-16, 1999).